Eight Interesting Facts About Cafe Terrace At Night

One of the most tragic celebrations in the world art history is Vincent Van Gogh. Although he was not very famous in his lifetime, he and his paintings got immense fame soon after his death-the time when he was no more to feel his fame! Today, his paintings are on peak demand and sold on record prices.

He painted a lot of night scene paintings in his lifetime. But his famous most painting on nightlife is Cafe Terrace at Night , which is completed sometime around mid September 1888. This painting has a special charm in it. With that charm, the painting has a lot of interesting facts attached to it that we are discussing hereunder:

1. Van Gogh's Cafe Terrace at Night is an ideal example of the artist's imagination and superb dealing with light. This painting captures the colors of light at night. 'Light' and 'night' seem contradictory words as this combination is hardly found in any scene.

2. In this painting, artificial gas lanterns lighten the night sky with a glimpse of exterior of a Parisian cafe. The cafe is still there and has been a popular destination for all Gogh's fans.

3. When this painting completed, Gogh wrote a letter to his sister stating that he has completed a night scene without using black.

4. Gogh painted this popular painting on the spot than painting it in daytime after preparing a sketch.

5. Although this painting is not signed by Gogh, his letters prove that this is his own work.

6. The painting is at the Kröller-Müller Museum in Netherlands now.

7. On its first official display in 1892, Coffee house in the evening was the name given to this painting. The title was later replaced by cafe Terrace at Night .

8. This is the first painting by Gogh with starry backgrounds.

Brief About The Painting

The painting represents the scene of night cafe. The terrace painted in this work has small figures of people drinking. A bright yellow lantern light up the terrace, frontage and side-walk. The rooftops of houses painted seem to have been fading road under the blue sky with stars and a green tree nearby. This beautiful painting is trying to distinguish the usual darkness of night with this green and blue night, that contradicting conventional night scenes.

Gogh has perseverance to propinquity and his keen ability to depict moment with so beautiful and bright colors made him one of the greatest colorist till date.

Learn Useful Tips When Selecting Groomsmen Gifts

Your wedding is fast-approaching and you still have not bought wedding gifts for your groomsmen. Ideally, if you want to get the best items, you have to buy ahead – at least two months ahead of the scheduled wedding. But if time does not permit, then you have no choice but to buy something. Do not worry, there are a lot of best groomsmen gift ideas that you can get especially if time is of the essence.

Here are some useful tips which you can follow when shopping for a special something for your groomsmen.

Pre-wedding preparation:

Most couples know how hard it is for them to actually bring to life the wedding of a lifetime. Preparations are usually done a year ahead of the scheduled wedding. Everything has to be perfect – the wedding gowns, the groom's tuxedo as well as the bridesmaids and the groomsmen's outfits. There is the thousand-dollar venue and caterer, the hotel and the expert wedding planners who will be in charge of all the smallest details. The couple already hired a professional photographer to document this unforgettable moment in their lives.

Perhaps one of the most important things a couple has to consider is shopping for their groomsmen and bridesmaids' wedding gift as a sign of appreciation and gratitude. They want to come up with the best gift ideas for their groomsmen and bridesmaids without having to use cramming tactics.

Do you have the budget for it?

The best groomsmen gift ideas do not have to be expensive. If money matters are not a concern, you can buy a classy watch or a one of a kind techie gadget. These are expensive items that are guaranteed great presents.

I know that the money you have been saving all these years are devoted to the most expensive hotels, catering services, photography expenses etc. I assume only part of your finances will be going to the wedding gifts. If you do not have a thousand budget for your groomsmen, you can opt for hundred dollar gifts. If this still is not right for the budget, you can still find cheap 20 to 75-dollar items that are still best gift ideas for your groomsmen.

If you are on a budget, there are under 20 dollars gift items which you can buy while online or offline. Items such as hip flasks, multi-purpose army knives, single-bladed knives, pens are perfect if money is a big issue.

However, you should keep in mind that if you buy these cheap items, you still have to put a little punk on it. Personalization is the perfect idea for this. You can have their names or initials engraved on that 20-dollar pen. That's easy right?

If, for example, you still do not want to settle for something which is generic, what you want to do is to get to know your groomsman's personality first. This way you'll get to choose something more individualized, something really special for him.

Individualized or personalized items such as sports bag are good for your sporty friends, suitcases, pens and toiletry kits for your business-minded groomsmen and camping-related items such as personalized flashlights, portable stainless steel thermos, and camping gears are best for outdoor enthusiasts.

Best groomsmen gift ideas for different personalities:

If your groomsman is a sports fanatic, then basketball, football, pool sticks or swimming goggles are perfect gift items. If you are thinking of giving them clothing items, make sure that they fit really well on them. If your best bud is more of an outdoor enthusiast, then you could go for personalized backpacks, trekking shoes, lighters, flashlights.

Running Gear Review – Nike Plus Vs Garmin Forerunner 205-305 GPS

As a gadget and tech junkie, it was to my good fortune that my initiation into the world of distance running roughly coincided with the appearance on the market of several new high-tech running gadgets: the Garmin Forerunner 205 and 305, and the Nike+ system. I have used both the Garmin Forerunner 205 and Nike+ for greater than 6 months each, and what follows is a review and comparison of my experiences with them.

The Nike+ System

Back in 2007, I was just beginning my life as a runner, and I was looking for tools to help me progress. The Garmin Forerunner and Nike+ systems both had instant appeal to my techie side, however I was initially hesitant to invest the several hundred dollars (at the time) needed to buy a Forerunner. I was also swept up in the excitement surrounding the introduction of the Nike+ system, and my first pair of “real” running shoes were Nike+ ready. Since I owned an Ipod Nano, and had shoes that could accommodate the little Nike+ foot pod accelerometer internally, I decided to give Nike + a try. In the interest of full disclosure, I’ll say at the outset that I no longer use the Nike+. However, that doesn’t necessarily mean that I wouldn’t recommend it to anyone since it does have its benefits and uses. The Nike+ certainly helped my running in those early days, and the motivation provided by the on-line Nike+ challenges was great. I liked being able to gauge my pace, track distance, and record my runs on-line. But for a perfectionist like myself, the Nike+ has some major drawbacks.

The most serious problem I had with the Nike+ was that it was only really accurate if I ran at the same steady pace on every run, and stuck to more-or-less flat ground. Any deviation from the pace you calibrate it at messes up both the pacing data as well as the distance recording for your run, and at times I found these measurements to be quite far off. Now, for many runners this is not a big deal, but if you like to mix up your training and include things like intervals, tempo runs, and long, slow runs, the Nike+ comes up way short. Furthermore, for me as a road racer, tenths of a mile and accurate pacing data matter a lot, so these shortcomings presented some major problems. That being said, I’m glad that I used it, and it did help a lot when I first started out. Even after I upgraded to the Garmin Forerunner 205, I did still continue to use Nike+ for treadmill runs (this probably goes without saying, but GPS doesn’t work on a treadmill). The Nike+ recordings on a treadmill are accurate enough, and in my case are more accurate than the readout of my treadmill’s own data console (it has never worked quite right for some reason).

I do believe that the Nike+ can be a valuable tool for a new or recreational runner. It’s cheap (less than $30.00), so it won’t dent your wallet too much if you decide you don’t like it, and the website and on-line community associated with Nike+ are both motivational and interesting. If you’re a new runner just starting out, or an experienced runner who tends to run most of your runs at the same pace, then the Nike+ would be a great addition to your running toolbox, and would surely provide some motivation for you to hit the road. However, as mentioned above, it has some major drawbacks for a serious runner who cares about missing tenths of a mile or needs really accurate pacing information.

Garmin Forerunner 205/305 GPS Wristwatch

If you want a personal running computer that will allow you to take your running to the next level and permit you to mix up your training runs with speed and long distance, you’re going to need something more than Nike+. I, unfortunately, am a perfectionist, and the inaccuracy of the pacing and distance data provided by Nike+ continually bugged me (and I was growing tired of mapping my runs on-line to figure out actual distances that I had covered). So, after about six months of consistent use, I decided to relegate the Nike+ to the treadmill only, and I asked Santa for a Garmin Forerunner 205 for Christmas. Sure enough, the fancy new GPS wristwatch was in my stocking, and it has not been absent from my wrist during a run in over a year. Simply stated, this is one of the coolest and most useful gadgets of any kind that I own, and it has allowed my running to progress in ways that probably would not have otherwise occurred.

First, let me explain the difference between the two current-generation Garmin Forerunner models (a fancy new waterproof model is on the way – the Garmin Forerunner 310 XT – but I’ll explain in a bit why I’d still go for one of the current ones for now if you’re considering a purchase). The two current models are the Forerunner 205 and the Forerunner 305. The only real differences between the two watches (besides color – the 205 is blue, and the 305 is red) are that the 305 can sync with an included heart rate monitor, an optional foot pod accelerometer (for the treadmill), and an optional speed-and-cadence sensor for your bike. Otherwise, from what I can gather, they are virtually identical. Given the minor price difference between the two Forerunners (about $10.00-$15.00 more for the 305), it would seem to make sense to go with the 305 if you’ve decided to buy a Forerunner.

So, I have now been using the Forerunner 205 regularly for over a year, and I have absolutely nothing but good things to say about it. The pacing data is right on (I have run enough chip-timed races with the 205 to verify this), as is the distance data. In addition to time, current pace, and distance, I have three data screens (which is the max on the 205/305) set up to show such variables as average pace, elevation, percent grade, calories burned, and time of day. Of all of these, the only one that seems somewhat iffy from time to time is the elevation, though if you smooth it out in one of the training programs that sync with the Forerunner, elevation patterns look pretty good as well. So far, I have pretty much exclusively used the Forerunner in its most basic mode – to simply track my data while I run. It is possible to configure things like training/pacing partners and interval workouts on the watch, and to use it as a (very) basic real-time GPS mapping device for things like hiking, but I haven’t used it much for this. In addition to running, I have used it while walking, snowshoeing, and biking (less extensively), and it works great for all of the above.

For me, the two features that matter most from a training and racing standpoint are accurate pacing and distance measurements, and as I said above this is where the Forerunner blows away the Nike+. I actually trust the Forerunner more than most of the on-line mapping programs when it comes to calculating distance, and being able to import all of my data into the computer is great. For the latter, I have skipped the included Garmin Training Center software and instead use an amazing, free program called Sportracks. Sportracks downloads all of the data from the Forerunner and lets you look at it in almost any way that you could possibly want. Among other things, Sportracks gives you GPS route maps, tons of data graphing options (e.g., pace vs. distance, pace vs. elevation, mile splits, etc.), and keeps a detailed running log that includes run times/dates, weather conditions pulled from the internet, distances run, and calories burned. As a scientist who loves data, Garmin Forerunner + Sportracks makes me one very happy runner.

A few last comments about some potential concerns with the Forerunner bear mentioning. One of the concerns I initially had about these watches was their size. Yes, they are big, but I have never noticed it as a nuisance while running, and I actually think the size is a positive rather than a negative since it makes it easier to read your data on the go. This is one of the major reasons why I would probably not consider upgrading to the newer and smaller Forerunner 405 – if you pack too many data streams on a small screen then things could get awful hard to read at mile 20 of a marathon. The other concern someone in the market for a GPS watch might have is the forthcoming new Garmin Forerunner 310 XT, which is waterproof to 50m and offers wireless data transfer. It would take a lot of new bells and whistles for me to spend an extra $100-$200 to choose to purchase the new 310 XT over the current 205 or 305. The new watch looks sportier, and the wireless sync feature is nice, but I don’t really care if I can dive to 50m with it on. If for some reason I’m out for a run and I wind up 50m underwater, I probably won’t be resurfacing to make it back home anyway (though in all seriousness, I can see how the 310 XT might be useful to a triathlete). For me, I’ll stick with the 205/305.

Hopefully I’ve given you a feel for what the Garmin Forerunner 205/305 can do. Really, there’s probably a lot more that it is capable of than what I have discussed here, but the best way to experience it is to try it out. As a runner who has now completed 1,266.01 miles (did I mention that I love accuracy!) with the Garmin Forerunner 205 (and it’s still going strong, with no major problems), I can honestly say that next to my running shoes, this is the most essential piece of running gear that I own. I highly recommend the Forerunner – get one and you won’t be disappointed.

A Home Insurance Guide For New Home Owners

To cover your private home, you need the best insurance policy which is the home insurance policy. It offers personal insurance protections, and liability insurance for home accidents.

Home insurance policies work with time. This means it expires. This policy has 7 major types;
i. Major homeowners insurance: this covers both the home and property against losses caused by disasters like vehicles; fire (lightening, volcano eruption, aircraft, wind, vandalism, self damages, smoke, theft, explosion and others.
ii. Also the basic homeowners insurance covers damages done by falling objects, water, electricity and snow including the first coverage.
iii. This covers the above coverage and also special items.
iv. This plan is also called renters insurance coverage and it protects and covers personal items / properties.
v. This particular plan provides your building and property full risk coverage.
vi. Your personal property is covered from disaster and it is called cadmium coverage.
vii. This plan insures older homes with historic value and it is restricted to monetary values ​​and repairs of the items in question.

Without insurance, you can still legally own a house. But it will be hard to establish a business relationship with any mortgagor.

When you desire a home desire a house insurance policy, you will be asked to present information on your kind of house, the value of your possession, and the kind of coverage you want. Your premium rate will be determined by the kind of liability coverage you desire.

To get a policy with reduced rate you need homeowners' insurance quotes.

Where to get the cheapest quotes from a trusted websites?